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Canon EOS-1D X 18.1MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera


Canon EOS-1D X 18.1MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera


Canon EOS 1D X Digital SLR Camera – BODY ONLY 5253B002

  • Full-frame 18.1 Megapixel CMOS sensor,1-Year Limited Warranty
  • All-new Dual DIGIC 5+ Image Processors deliver high quality image capture at up to 12 fps (14 fps in Super High Speed Mode)
  • Powerful ISO range of 100 – 51200 (up to 204800 in H2 mode)
  • An all-new, 61-Point High-Density Reticular AF that uses a dedicated DIGIC 4 Image Processor
  • Durable construction, including shutter durability tested to 400,000 cycles
  • Full-frame 18.1 Megapixel CMOS sensor.
  • All-new Dual DIGIC 5+ Image Processors deliver high quality image capture at up to 12 fps (14 fps in Super High Speed Mode).
  • Powerful ISO range of 100 – 51200 (up to 204800 in H2 mode).
  • An all-new, 61-Point High-Density Reticular AF that uses a dedicated DIGIC 4 Image Processor.
  • Durable construction, including shutter durability tested to 400,000 cycles.

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Canon PowerShot G15 12MP Digital Camera with 3-Inch LCD (Black)


Canon PowerShot G15 12MP Digital Camera with 3-Inch LCD (Black)


The PowerShot G15 features a newly developed 5x Optical Zoom with 28mm Wide-Angle, bright f/1.8(W) – f/2.8 (T) lens, Canon’s HS SYSTEM, plus upgraded video capture in 1080p Full HD with stereo sound. The PowerShot G12 brings EOS line features like the 12-bit multi aspect RAW+JPEG formatting into a compact camera.What’s in the box: Canon PowerShot G15 Digital Camera, NB-10L Lithium-Ion Battery Pack for PowerShot SX40 HS, CB-2LC Battery Charger for NB-10L Battery for PowerShot SX40 HS, NS-DC11 Neck Strap, Digital Camera Solution CD and 1-Year Limited Warranty.

  • Bright 3-inch LCD with 922,000 dots enables easy viewing
  • 12.1 megapixel high-sensitivity CMOS sensor
  • DIGIC 5 image processor
  • 5x optical zoom (28mm-140mm)
  • Capture stunning 1080p Full HD video in stereo sound with a dedicated movie button

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What customers say about Canon EOS-1D X 18.1MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera?

  1. 301 of 344 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    1DX is Good, not Perfect, July 23, 2012
    By 
    S. Meyer “Wedding Photographer” (Greenwood, IN USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Canon EOS-1D X 18.1MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera (Camera)

    This is a summary of my experience with the Canon 1DX. Skip to the bottom of this review if you want final impressions of the camera after the honeymoon period. My previous camera was the 5DII, mainly for weddings and portraits. I look for low light performance.

    1st Day 7/20/2012 I took several photos of my 13 year old daughter in dark incandescent light at 6400 and 25,600 ISO with an 85/1.2II lens at f/2.0. I ran both photos through LR4 with +10 noise reduction. I shoot in RAW. Here’s what I noticed. At 6400 ISO, I could see the downy blond baby hairs on her forehead and there wasn’t much noise in the dark areas, just grain. At 25,600 ISO, the dark areas had grainy noise and those little downy hairs disappeared. But, the image was totally usable. My wife really liked it. I noticed that at these high ISO’s underexposure results in a significant increase in noise in the dark areas. So, overexposing a little minimizes noise at the higher ISO’s. The autofocus is blazing fast in good light, and in dim light it slows down, taking 1 to 3 seconds to focus. This is a 1/3 stop improvement over my 5DII, which was a solid low light focuser (because I had sent it in to have AF tweaked). I was expecting more improvement, but I’ll take it. One deficiency is that in Manual mode, the exposure indicator does not show up on the top LCD, only when looking into the viewfinder. It does so on the 5DII and 40D. I called Canon and it turns out this is unique to 1D’s. I relied on this as a quick light meter check without having to look into the viewfinder. Customers expect me to start snapping photos once I start looking into the viewfinder.

    7/26/2012 I did an experiment to see how quickly the camera buffer might fill up using a high speed UDMA card. I held down the shutter and took 200 images without letting up. The camera quit working and showed error code 30, which was a locked shutter. I returned it for a new unit. Canon CPS said I should have been able to take as many images as I wanted without the shutter locking up. I won’t try this again.

    7/30/2012 I received the replacement and snapped photos for a half an hour. When I put the lens cap back onto the 85/1.2II I mistakenly pressed the shutter button halfway and got an error code 80. It went away after taking the cap back off. Canon said error code 80 was software-related.

    8/8/2012 I photographed my daughter swinging using the 85/1.2II lens. This is probably Canon’s slowest focusing lens because of the way it moves the entire heavy internal glass. It’s meant for portraits, not for sports. With my daughter coming toward me, the AF tracked her in AIServo. To give some perspective, this is something I have never been able to do with the 5DII and 40D. The glass takes 1.5 seconds to move from one end to the other. Looking at them in LR4, I had a 50% keeper rate, which is excellent given that the 5DII would have had none. This camera has more power in the AF to move the glass faster. Very nice. What I’m not liking? The AF point doesn’t light up when I press the shutter halfway down until it locks focus. That means in very dark conditions, I have to guess where the AF point is. I could press the AF selection button to light it up, but that’s a delay which defeats the element of speed and it also lights up all the AF points like a Christmas tree. It took several calls to Canon CPS for me to realize that this feature, which was on the 5DII, is now gone. Some of Canon’s CPS techs were convinced it was there and it just needed to be turned on. It’s really gone.

    8/13/2012 Two weddings. One was very dark and went late into the night. I did some portraits of the couple walking around the gardens in the dark as I experimented with off camera flash. These images are usually my clients’ favorites because of the dramatic light effects. But, it’s usually the end of the day and clients are tired. I have to work fast. The AF not blinking with a half-press of the shutter button was a problem. It took nearly 10 to 20 seconds to lock focus versus 3 to 5 seconds with the 5DII. After a few of these, the couple wanted to head back. With the 5DII, I half press the shutter button and the AF point blinks to let me know where it is. Then, I move this AF point to focus on a high contrast area of the face or edge of the white dress, recompose, and take the shot. Then, it’s off to the next pose or location for another shot or two. With the 1DX, I was unable to locate a high contrast area without knowing exactly where the center AF point was. It was grayed out. As a workaround, I tried using the AF point selection button on the back. It lit up all the AF points and blinded that eye to the dark. Using this camera in low light slows me down compared to the 5DII. I’m baffled as to what Canon was thinking when they decided to eliminate lit up AF points.

    8/28/2012 Another wedding in fairly…

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  2. 80 of 94 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Canon 1DX versus Canon’s 1D Mark IV, August 24, 2012
    By 
    Mark Kitaoka (Pacifica, CA United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Canon EOS-1D X 18.1MP Full Frame CMOS Digital SLR Camera (Camera)

    Although I didn’t purchase my 1DX through Amazon, I’m posting this review. My local retailer obtained my camera before it became available on Amazon…regrettable!

    I was never really a ‘full frame zealot’ and liked the 1.3 crop of the Mark IV. Gave me that extra bit of reach when I needed it, but conversely I was sometimes frustrated that I could not get as wide a shot as I wanted because of it. I purchased a 5D Mark III earlier this year since the 1DX was so delayed. I figured I would sell the 5D once the the 1DX came out. Bought the battery grip for it because I really missed the portrait grip and it had the extra joystick I was SO looking forward to on the 1DX. Then I got use to a full frame camera. The bokah on them is really stunning. Never really missed the extra reach losing 30% bought me with the Mark IV. Loved the new autofocus points too. Gave me more places to put my single focus point since I’m not a big focus and recompose guy. I find that technique for many of the apertures I shoot at caused me to lose DOF and as a result out of focus shots.

    I also compared the ISO performance of the 5DIII with my Mark IV. Not a lot better on the 5DIII in what I shoot so I was a bit concerned about how much better the 1DX would be when it was released. Remember that I OFTEN shoot at high ISO for live theatrical performances. The average is around 6400-12800. If the scene has ‘good’ light I’m down around 1600-3200. In that 6400-12800 range the 5DIII was on par with the Mark IV.

    The menu layout on the 5DIII is the same as the 1DX so when the 1DX was finally available I was better suited to get into the 1DX right away. What I really appreciated were the new AF menu layouts. Rather than having to go through all of the trial and error of figuring out how to configure AI Servo situations reading through the menu examples really helps me out. I’m not sure how often you use AI Servo, but I use it about for about 20% of my work both in studio and during live performances depending on the subject matter. Dance is one area where I find AI Servo to be very useful. I especially like the expansion point options on the 1DX, Zone expansion that was not available on the Mark IV.

    The part that I absolutely HATE about the 1DX focusing versus the Mark IV is the elimination of the constant red illumination of the focus point. Let me explain. On the Mark IV even when you have not depressed the shutter or back focus button the focus points remains illuminated red. On the 1DX (and 5DIII too) unless you have pressed either focus button the focus point remains black. In the heat of the moment (where I am always at!) it’s almost impossible to know where your focus point is at the time before pressing the shutter halfway or the back focus button. I have missed several shots because of this. Apparently Canon is working on a ‘fix’ but it’s not as easy as it sounds. Apparently the exposure will change based upon the red illumination points and vary again depending on where that point is in the viewfinder. In my world I would gladly give up a slight change in exposure which can be fixed in Post versus having an out of focus shot. I hope they resolve this since it’s my biggest bitch with the camera. (both of them)

    I have found that with the 1DX ISO 25600 is VERY usable and about on par with the Mark IV’s 12800. 25600 is better than the 5DIII’s 12800, so for double the price you get 1 stop better low light performance. I rarely used 25600 on the Mark IV because it was just too noisy for my needs. My personal comparison is the 1DX’s 25600 is on par with the Mark IV’s 12800. BUT what I like is the ability to move up from 25600 to 51200 in 1/3 stop increments. I have used 32000 with great success when needed. But for me that’s just one part of the overall equation.

    I have not been able to print very large format images yet from the 1DX. I just finished an assignment up in Seattle and will report my findings once the billboards are printed. I can say this, with the Mark IV my images have been used on five billboard campaigns without any up-sizing through programs like Genuine Fractals or such with great success.

    Handling
    Now this area is VERY hard to explain, quantify, etc. When I was using the 5DIII in both a studio and live performance environment it just felt ‘sluggish’ to me compared to my Mark IV. Now don’t assume I’m talking about the FPS difference as I rarely use that mode since I tend to be a single shooter. Most experienced action shooters including myself will tell you that anticipation and timing is the BEST way to get the ‘moment’ and although the high frame rate is great, it will never guarantee (and often miss) that defining moment we all strive to capture. No what I’m talking about is the absolute IMMEDIATE reaction from me thinking about pressing the shutter to actually having it ‘click.’ The 5DIII almost seemed like a point and shoot compared to…

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  3. 368 of 381 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Nice upgrade from the G12. Simple review., October 2, 2012
    By 
    D. Hentze (United States) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Canon PowerShot G15 12MP Digital Camera with 3-Inch LCD (Black) (Electronics)
    I’ve long been a fan of my trusty Canon G12. Since it hasn’t been upgraded in quite some time, I thought it was the end of the line for the series. When the G15 was announced, I immediately wanted one. Having had it for a couple of days now, I’m very happy with it. Out of the box, the biggest difference I noticed was that the G15 no longer has an articulated swivel screen. To a lot of people, this will be a huge disappointment. There is a positive to this though. Without it, the camera is thinner and lighter now. The screen is also larger and higher resolution. (3″, 920K). The lens has the same focal length as the G12, but the new G15 lens has a wider aperture. f1.8 vs f2.8. My results show a nice improvement in low light situations. Canon has also improved the auto-focus speed. Megapixels have been increased from 10mp to 12mp. The G15 has a 1/1.7″ CMOS sensor, which is larger than most compact style cameras. The DSLR style controls and menus are easy to navigate and understand. On my initial battery charge, I managed just over 300 shots, which I consider good. Now for the most important thing. Image quality. I took several hundred pictures in various conditions. Image quality was excellent under all circumstances. I shot in JPEG mode, using ISO 80-800. Images shot outdoors in good lighting conditions were almost DSLR quality. Images shot indoors were excellent too. Image noise up to ISO 400 was barely noticeable. At ISO 800, noise become more noticeable, but results were still much better than you’d expect from a compact camera. I only shot a minimal amount of video since I have little interest in using it, but what I did shoot does look good. The G15 can do 1080P at 24fps. All in all, the Canon G15 is just a great camera.

    Pros:
    Excellent image quality.
    Fast 5x 28-140mm lens.
    RAW image capture.
    DSLR style manual controls.
    Good battery life.
    Fairly thin and lightweight.
    3″, 920K screen.
    Optical viewfinder.

    Cons:
    No articulated screen.
    Ergonomics might be awkward to some.

    0

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  4. 202 of 216 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    An excellent camera, October 2, 2012
    By 
    S. Vogt

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Canon PowerShot G15 12MP Digital Camera with 3-Inch LCD (Black) (Electronics)
    Updated 9/25/13

    The first thing I noticed when I took the G15 out of its box for the first time was its impressive build quality. Everything is tightly constructed and what feels like a tough mag alloy body. It’s not necessarily pocketable but is slightly smaller and thinner than the G12. One minor complaint, however, is that the handgrip up front seems shallower than on the G12 so at first it doesn’t feel as comfortable to grip. The battery is of a good size and the camera gets excellent battery life.

    The control layout on the back of the camera is the same as the G12 and G1X, generally straight-forward and logically placed. The menu system has not changed at all from previous models… so if you’re coming from the G12, you should be able to locate where everything is rather quickly. You have the function button for the most commonly accessed settings and the menu button for all other settings. The LCD on back, while sadly, not articulated like on the G12 is gorgeous…very bright and clear. The viewfinder is the same small one found in the G1X and G12..but it works okay when you can’t use the LCD.

    Canon promised improved AF performance over the G12 and it is most certainly quicker. It isn’t the fastest in its class but it does have reliable AF and no problems even in low light locking on. Most folks will find it perfectly satisfactory. Lens performance is quite snappy though, and you can zoom in and out relatively quickly. The camera also has some of the most rock solid image stabilization on any camera I have seen.

    The image quality that this camera produces is excellent considering its sensor size. You can of course wring out more detail out of your photos if you shoot RAW. But the JEPGS are excellent as well. Color performance is excellent. It produces punchy but accurate colors and the lens is decently sharp at all focal lengths. Noise is well controlled through ISO400 but you can still get decent results up through ISO1600, especially if you shoot RAW and don’t blow the photos up to huge sizes. However, with the fast lens, you may never need to go that high. My one minor gripe with this camera is that it overexposes at times. You can correct that problem very quickly though by dialing in some negative exposure compensation. But overall, I think most people will find the photos that this camera produces very nice.

    I have not messed much with the movie mode but it has a few manual controls. One feature that stuck out to me is the 1280×720 HD iframe recording, which can be imported right into Apple video editing software without losing any of its quality. If this feature is important to you…the new G16 does not have this feature so it might be worth sticking with the G15.

    Judged by image quality alone, the Sony RX100 models are at the top of the enthusiast point and shoot heap. But if you’re not interested in plunking down $650-$750, this camera offers a well-rounded shooting experience and will probably give you many years of dependable operation and great photos. This camera is soon to be replaced by the G16, which will command a $100 price premium over this model. The G16 is an overall much faster camera with about the same photo quality (maybe slightly improved high ISO performance), but if you’re fine with slower AF and don’t need the high burst rate of the G16, I would save your money and get the G15.

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