Home » Canon » Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 VC PZD All-In-One Zoom Lens for Canon DSLR, Model BOO8E Filter Size 062mm


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Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 VC PZD All-In-One Zoom Lens for Canon DSLR, Model BOO8E Filter Size 062mm


Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 VC PZD All-In-One Zoom Lens for Canon DSLR, Model BOO8E Filter Size 062mm

  • Extremely fast Piezo drive focusing motor
  • Vibration Compensation for ultra sharp images
  • Compact design
  • long zoom range for versatility
  • Designed for APS-C sized sensors
    • Extremely fast Piezo drive focusing motor
    • Vibration Compensation for ultra sharp images
    • Compact design
    • 15x zoom range for versatility
    • Designed for APS-C sized sensors
    • Like two lenses in one

    We have searched the web to find the best prices available Click Here to find our where to get the Best Deal on Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 VC PZD All-In-One Zoom Lens for Canon DSLR, Model BOO8E Filter Size 062mm

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    What customers say about Tamron AF 18-270mm f/3.5-6.3 VC PZD All-In-One Zoom Lens for Canon DSLR, Model BOO8E Filter Size 062mm?

    1. 1,322 of 1,345 people found the following review helpful
      3.0 out of 5 stars
      Finally an “all in one lens”??? YES, BUT……, February 14, 2011
      By 
      Naftade “naftade” (Camelot) –

      ….Versatility never comes without cost:

      GENERAL
      + First impression when mounted to my t2i was “wow”. I could hardly believe how small this thing really is considering it’s zoom range! It’s also very light (only a tiny little bit heavier than a Tamron 17-50 2.8!)
      You can carry it around easily and my t2i felt very well balanced with it. – A good start
      + the lens comes with a lens hood (you see Canon!?) and with a 5 years warranty. That’s quite a package, even though the lens hood (being suitable for all offered focal lengths) cannot really help when you are zoomed in to the max.

      BUILT QUALITY
      +- the lens is manufactured in China. Quality appearance is ok, but nothing to rave about

      IMAGE QUALITY
      Resolution
      +- considering it’s enormous range, I was surprised how sharp this lens can get. Resolution is not the reason why I finally opted against the product. It never really gets razor sharp, but at least at most focal lengths it will get the job done. As long as you don’t plan to print really big, contemplate your pictures at 100% view on a monitor, or plan to crop details, things will look quite all right (i will upload a few samples, to show you). There are only a few focal lengths at which it delivers really poor resolution unless stopped down at least two f-stops. Unfortunately two rather important settings are among these problematic ones. At the end of the zoom range (250-270 mm f 6.3) and at it’s beginning (18 mm f 3.5) pictures can look plainly soft. Especially at the long end, this can be very disturbing as you need a whole lot of light anyway when shooting at 270mm. At f8 things look better, but you won’t blur your background that easily and of course you will need quite bright light to get these shots free of shake.

      Speed
      - As I just said, the lens isn’t what you would call fast at any rate. Moreover you need to stop it down to gain decent IQ at some settings and last but not least, it’s higher minimum apertures kick in rather early (e.g. at a “portrait length” of 100mm it is already 5.6!) – a major draw-back for a so called “all purpose lens”. I wouldn’t recommend it to anybody who plans to shoot a lot in low light.

      Vignetting
      +- Vignetting is visible but I’ve seen worse (especially if you (again) take into account the long range). It also can be corrected quite easily.

      Chromatic aberrations
      - Purple fringing can be a problem at almost all focal lengths. Stopping down helps but it does not reduce CAs to zero.

      Contrast
      - Contrast in general is not the strong point of this lens. between 24 and – say – 200mm it is alright when stopped down a little. In general I had more work to fine tune contrast than usual.

      Colors
      +- Due to the somewhat weak contrast colors aren’t too snappy and sometimes I felt, I could see some kind of yellowish cast. In general, however, colors looked good to me.

      Flares/Ghosting
      + I had no problems with flares

      IMAGE STABILIZER
      + The IS-System of the lens works quite fine and without too much noise (only a faint zzzzzzzzz). I wouldn’t expect it to give you more than two to two an a half f-stops.
      When using your camera on a tripod you should definitely switch it off, as it visibly degrades IQ when used with a tripod

      AUTOFOCUS
      +- The new piezo drive was one of the reasons for me to give this lens a try (I don’t like the focussing speed of my Canon 55-250 IS, which is both slow and noisy).
      The Tamron 18-270 PZD focus is almost inaudible and in general quite precise. Focussing speed however is not impressive. I believe there are many micro-motor AF-systems out there that do the job quicker.
      This system here is by no means comparable to Canon’s USM…too bad

      VERSATILITY
      +++ Nothing to complain about here. Within a twist of a zoom-ring you can take almost every picture stye from landscape via Portrait to wild-life close-ups (if the beasts don’t move too quick). The capabilities of this lens in this respect are nothing short of amazing. The one thing it doesn’t do too well is macro.

      CONCLUSION
      If you are the kind of photographer that shoots mainly in bright light,
      if you usually watch your photos on smaller screens or prints,
      if you’re not a “pixel-peeper”
      if you do not like carrying lenses around or just don’t want to switch them
      if you’re looking for a light all-round travel lens
      if you are more than anything a spontaneous photographer
      the Tamron 18-270 3.5-6-3 pzd is made just for you.

      However

      if you are seeking the “perfect picture”
      if you like snappy colors and contrasts
      if you are a “sharpness-victim”
      if you like to print big or crop your images to point out details
      if you’re searching for high end built quality
      You will have to look elsewhere and make your…

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    2. 110 of 114 people found the following review helpful
      4.0 out of 5 stars
      Just became the default lens for my T1i, March 24, 2011
      By 
      Larry B (Chandler, AZ United States) –

      Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
      Here’s the thing: If you are expecting something along the lines of a Canon L series lens you will be disappointed.

      On the other hand, if you are expecting something you can use to take the place of the two standard kit lenses usually sold for the T1i or T2i; something that you can leave on most of the time and NOT have to change lenses very often, you’ll probably like this.

      This is a new lens for Tamron, but is an update for one they’ve had in the field for a while. I was a little hesitant about getting something this new in the product cycle but the lure of having a single lens for carrying around on the camera, and early reviews of it, convinced me to give it a try. On arrival I set it up on my camera and did some quick tests in anticipation of an upcoming trip. (This isn’t meant to be an in-depth test and I reserve the right to modify it after spending more time with it.)

      As other people have noted, this lens is a little on the “soft” side (refers to pictures not being tack sharp at all apertures and focal lengths). I compared it side-by-side with the Canon 18-55mm kit lens and the Canon 55-250mm kit lens. My test involved staging some shots at my house, under natural light, from a tripod at various backdrops and resolution charts. Not super scientific, but enough to tell me if I was going to send it back without further use.

      The good news is that it performed about the same as the Canon kit lenses. It’s a little slower and a little bit less sharp. But the overall sharpness seems to be very close. Higher f-stops (f/11 and up) seem to help a lot. Since I’m buying it to use as a walk-around lens I expect it will perform adequately for my purposes. If I wanted super sharp, I would spend a lot of money for a lens dedicated to that purpose. I bought this lens for those times when I want the camera with me but don’t expect to be getting photos of the Elvis-Bigfoot Reunion Tour on their flying saucer.

      The auto-focus in bright light and with a contrasty image was blindingly fast. In low light, it tended to hunt before giving up. Be aware that you have to turn the AF/MF switch to MF (Manual Focus) if you need to focus manually. Failure to do so–forcing the focus ring to turn while on AF–may damage the lens. This is true of the Canon kit lenses as well.

      The image stabilizing function (VC) worked well, but I’d rate it as being worth about 2 stops instead of the 4 that Tamron claims. In a quiet environment you can hear the VC motors doing their thing but it’s certainly not obtrusive.

      I did note one thing that I found a bit puzzling but have decided to live with: At maximum focal length, I was “closer” to the target on the 250mm Canon than on the 270mm Tamron. The numbers seem to indicate that the opposite should be the case. It’s not enough for me to send it back, but I was a little disappointed as I’d been expecting to be able to zoom in just about 10% more with this lens.

      One last thing: Tamron’s zoom ring turns the opposite of Canon’s. That is, when the lens is on the camera, and you’re holding it the normal way, turning it in the direction that zooms IN on a Canon lens will zoom OUT on the Tamron. They’ve always been like this. I can live with that, but it does mess up my muscle memory almost every time.

      Overall, I like the lens so far and think it will be a worthwhile investment for those times when changing a lens isn’t part of the game plan due to environment (dust, water), time (general purpose shooting) or inclination (laziness).

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