Home » Nikon » Nikon D3100 14.2MP Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR DX Zoom Lenses and 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black)


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"This Best Selling Nikon D3100 14.2MP Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR DX Zoom Lenses and 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black) Tends to SELL OUT VERY FAST! If this is a MUST HAVE product, be sure to Order Now to avoid disappointment!"

Nikon D3100 14.2MP Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR DX Zoom Lenses and 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black)


Nikon D3100 14.2MP Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR DX Zoom Lenses and 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black)


The Nikon D3100 Digital SLR Camera is an affordable, compact, and lightweight photographic power-house. It features a high-resolution 14.2 MP CMOS sensor along with a feature set that’s comprehensive yet easy to navigate – the intuitive onboard learn-as-you grow guide mode allows the photographer to understand what the 3100 can do quickly and easily. Capture beautiful pictures and amazing Full HD 1080p movies with sound and full-time autofocus. Easily capture the action other cameras miss with a fast start up time, split-second shutter release, 3 frames per second shooting and 11-point autofocus. Capture pictures and make movies in near darkness with an ISO range of 100 to 3200 (expandable to 12800-Hi2). EXPEED 2, Nikon’s new image processing engine, assures breathtakingly rich image quality, managing color, contrast, exposure and noise. One-touch Live View and movie recording lets you see the action on the 3″ monitor and the Scene Recognition System automatically chooses the ideal settings. You can also select from 6 Automatic Exposure Scene Modes- Portrait, Landscape, Child, Sports, Close-up or Night Portrait for stunning results in otherwise challenging conditions. Active D-Lighting restores picture-enhancing detail in shadows and highlights. A built-in pop-up flash is ready for those times when there just isn’t enough light and in-camera image editing allows creative freedom and effects, without the need for a computer.

  • 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 VR lens
  • 55-200mm f/4-5.6G VR lens
  • EN-EL 14 rechargeable Li-ion battery
  • Full 1080p HD Cinematic Video with full-time autofocus and sound
  • Full 1080p HD Cinematic Video with full-time autofocus and sound

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What customers say about Nikon D3100 14.2MP Digital SLR Camera with 18-55mm VR, 55-200mm VR DX Zoom Lenses and 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black)?

  1. 2,471 of 2,530 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Nikon D3100 VS. D300 VS. D700, September 23, 2010
    By 

    For the cost of this camera, I don’t think you can get anything better. The low light performance is off the charts. As a wedding photographer I regularly shoot with Nikon’s high end professional equipment and I was amazed how close this camera is to a pro camera. Now let me get specific. In order to compare I took a look at 100% files out of each camera I own.

    Which camera excels Nikon D3100($Cheap) VS. D300($1600) VS. D700 ($2,700):
    * Lens = The D3100 is the only camera that comes with a lens at it’s normal price
    * ISO Performance = Tie between D3100 and D700! (It could be Nikon’s new processing but the JPEG looks fantastic I was shooting D3100 on 6400iso with very little noise at all)
    * Low Light Focusing = D700
    * Focus Speed = D700
    * External Buttons & Controls for Pros = D700
    * Menu Navigation = D3100
    * Ease of Use = D3100
    * Megapixel = D3100 (14.2)
    * Sensor size = D700 (Much more important than megapixels but I won’t get into this)
    * Can use older lenses with functionality = D700 & D300
    * Video = D3100 of course! 1080P video looks amazing.
    * Frame Rate = D300 at 6 photos a second
    * Weight = D3100 (light as a feather)
    * Ergonomics = D700 (big enough for all my finger)

    Lens:
    The lens is a kit lens, it will work outside but not so great in low light. The Vibration Reduction will help indoors but Vibration Reduction can’t stop a child or pet in motion indoors. Consider buying a 35mm 1.8dx AFS for around $200 and you will be super happy with this camera.

    Video:
    I purchased the 3100 specifically to shoot video, so I put on Nikon’s brand new 85mm 1.4g Nano lens and shot video with it. The lens costs more than double the camera but I wanted to see how the 1080P video looked. It has the look of a cinematic movie. After the 85mm, I put on Nikon’s 50 1.2 manual focus lens and was able to take very cinematic video in manual mode. In order to make it brighter or darker you either need to use a really old lens like the 50mm 1.2 and hit the AE-L (auto exposure lock) and twist the aperture to change exposure. Or you can hit the AE-L button when you get the exposure you like. Its not a perfect system but it works well for me. Inside the menu options you can change the AE-L button to hold the setting until you reset which is helpful.

    Jello Cam (What’s not so great):
    This camera still suffers from the “Jello Cam” look in video if it is not on a tripod and you are shaky. The video can look like jello if moved too quickly. Use a monopod or tripod when shooting to avoid this. I’m not sure if a faster video frame rate 60fps would help – but at 24 and 30 it can suffer badly.

    Conclusion:
    This is an amazing deal! Unless you make most of your income from photography or have a stockpile of old lenses (this camera can only autofocus with AFS lenses) then this camera is the must have camera of the year. If you have good composition skills and an eye for light you can take photos worthy of a magazine with this. Seriously, you won’t regret buying this camera. When you do, do yourself a favor and buy an additional Nikon AFS lens that has a maximum aperture of 2.8, 1.8 or 1.4. These lenses will take better portraits and deal better in low light than the kit lens.

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  2. 443 of 452 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Review Written for Beginner Photographers, October 16, 2011
    By 
    jpullos (New York, NY) –

    I am a photography teacher in NYC and online. (See my Amazon profile for my website.) I teach beginner and intermediate photography students every week. I’ve also been a professional photographer for the last five years with images published in The New York Times, GQ, New York Magazine, Women’s Wear Daily, The New York Observer, The Village Voice and Time Out New York.

    (This review is for beginner photographers.)

    If you’re a beginner, you’re most likely asking yourself: Nikon or Canon? Really, I feel confident in saying that you can’t go wrong with either. I’ve used both brand’s cameras extensively and find that they both offer amazing image quality with well-built, solid cameras that, if taken care of, will last decades. There are two differences between the cameras, though, that can be taken into consideration.

    The user-interface: If cameras were computers, Nikons would be PCs and Canons would be MACs. PCs are built for people not afraid of technology whereas Macs are built for people who want things super-easy. Nikons excel at customization options which means you’ll see so many more options with the Advanced features of a Nikon than you will with a Canon. Canons, on the other hand, excel at ease-of-use for beginners. Canons offer less advanced options and can be easier to learn on. This can be frustrating down the line, though, once you’ve learned a lot about photography. At that point you may want all of the options that Nikon offers and be frustrated with your Canon. If you’re someone who really likes to delve deep into your hobbies or if you’re intent on becoming a professional photographer, I’d say a Nikon would be your best bet. If you’re someone who wants to learn the basics of photography and only imagine yourself being a hobbyist, Canon would be a better option for you.

    Where Nikon excels: Flash photography. I often find myself in situations where I’m shooting event photography (weddings, movie premiers, benefits and galas) where I need to use a lot of flash. For this kind of photography, I’ll always prefer to be shooting with a Nikon. Nikon’s flash metering (how the camera magically decides how much light to fire out of the flash) is much more consistent than Canon’s. You can take a Canon and shoot the same scene three times in a row with flash and all three images will be at different brightness levels. You can do the same thing with a Nikon and all three images will be wonderfully the same. If you’re somebody who plans on shooting a lot with flash (indoor photography, event photography, etc.) you’ll want to consider going with Nikon.

    Where Canon excels: Richness of colors. I’ve been in numerous situations where I’ve been on the red carpet taking the exact same picture as the photographer next to me. I’ll have a Canon and the person next to me will have a Nikon. This has provided quite a few opportunities to compare the images side-by-side. What I’ve found is that the colors on the Canon’s images look richer and make the image pop more. If I’m doing fine art photography (anything I’d like to someday hang in a gallery), I’ll always want to be shooting with a Canon for this reason.

    If you’re set on Nikon, there are three cameras you should be considering and it all comes down to what your budget is:

    D7000 $1,400 without lens
    D5100 $750 without lens
    D3100 $600 only available with lens
    (current prices as of 2/19/11)

    Here’s what you get for spending extra money (each camera compared to the one below it):

    D3100 vs. D5100:

    The D3100 is an EXCELLENT camera so if you only have $550 to spend total on camera and lens then go out and buy this camera. You won’t regret it. If you’re considering spending more money, here’s what you’ll get from the D5100 in comparison:

    -Better performance in low light situations.
    -A higher resolution screen on the back of the camera so you can see your images more clearly and make out if they actually turned out well.
    -An external mic jack. (If you’re planning on shooting video with an external mic, you’ll want the D5100 over the D3100.)
    -A flip out screen (handy if you want to put your camera anywhere but at your eye level and be able to see what your camera is about to capture before you shoot it)
    -Faster continuous shooting. If you’re often shooting sports or any fast moving subject, continuous shooting allows you to capture multiple images in a single second. The D3100 shoots at three frames per second whereas the D5100 shoots at four frames per second.
    -Higher ISO options. The D5100 offers one more stop of ISO than the D3100 does. If you don’t know what ISO means (or what a stop is) just know that this allows you to more easily shoot images in low-light situations.
    -Longer battery life. The D5100′s battery will last 20% longer than the D3100

    The two advantages of the D3100 over the D5100 are:…

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  3. 516 of 538 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Takes excellent pictures and gets out of the way while doing it, November 14, 2010
    By 
    Macauley86 (California, United States) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    This Nikon D3100 is a phenomenal deal for non professionals, the rest of us people that want to take family and travel shots. I’ve owned DSLRs since 2004, starting with a Nikon D70 and then moving to D40, D200 and Canon Digital Rebel XSi 12.2 MP Digital SLR Camera with EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (Black) and Canon EOS 40D 10.1MP Digital SLR Camera (Body Only). Those are all excellent cameras, but this Nikon D3100 is better than all of those in one crucial area, the area that matters: it takes excellent pictures without having to fiddle with the settings between shots. Yes, the other cameras are better in other respects: They have more buttons to change settings without delving into menus, they are bigger (is that a plus?), heavier (another plus?), and have better specs (1/500 flash sync speed for D70 and D40), but in the end I would have to fiddle with the settings to get the best results: change the white balance, fiddle with the ISO (my Canons would default to ISO 400 for flash shots, why? Who knows. That meant disabling auto ISO and choosing ISO settings manually), the exposure (+0.7 indoor, 0 outdoor), and so on. D200 was noisy at higher ISO, D70′s pictures tended to be cool (i.e. not warm), 40D had cool custom buttons (C1, C2, C3, very cool), but I found its ergonomics worse than XSi or any Nikon; why place the on/off switch at the bottom of the body? Who knows. Fortunately, new Canons have fixed this).

    This D3100 also makes the D3000 and D5000 obsolete. The D3000 is slow and noisy at high ISO. The D5000 only shoots 720p (not 1080p), no autofocus in movie mode, less resolution. Old technology.

    What sets the D3100 apart from all the other cameras above is this: set the camera in P (program) mode, auto white balance, -0.3 exposure compensation, slow flash sync mode (for people shots), auto distortion correction on (great!), auto chromatic aberrations correction on (great!), and you are set; now you can concentrate on the only aspect of photography that matters: composition, i.e. framing your shot in the best possible way. There must be a photography mantra that says, “thou shalt buy the D3100, and the D3100 will set you free.” Now this is if you shot jpeg. If you shoot raw, you can then use a program like DXO, Aperture 3, or Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 3 to further play with the pictures. My workflow with the XSi was to shoot raw, then use DXO to batch process all the pics according to two settings: people (low contrast, no saturation added) and landscape (contrast, saturation, etc.). DXO would then batch-remove lens distortion, chromatic aberrations, vignetting, apply custom curves, change white balance when necessary, and apply its (almost magical) auto lighting settings to make the shots pop. For now DXO does not have a custom module for the D3100 (still too new of a camera), so I’m shooting jpeg for now. Once DXO adds the module for the D3100, I’ll takes shots in both raw and jpeg fine and compare the jpegs straight out of the camera with the raw images processed with DXO. I’m curious to see the comparison.

    This is great, not only for you, but also for your non-photographer spouse; my XSi took phenomenal shots, but I had to know how to set it. Can you imagine me going to my non-photographer wife and say, “okay, when you take indoor shots of our kids, set the camera on A mode (Canons expose for ambient light in A mode and adjust flash for fill, that’s great), +0.7 exposure compensation, ISO 400 or 800, white balance on cloudy, and shoot.” My wife was lost at “okay.” Sure the custom modes on the 40D would have helped, but the 40D is old technology; can it take 1080p video? I didn’t think so. Plus, what lens are you going to use with the 40D? The 17-55 IS? Great lens, but who wants to spend $1,000 for a non-weather sealed 17-55 dust collector (google Canon 17-55 and dust)? Will 17-55 be enough for your telephoto shots? Your kids’ baseball games? Didn’t think so. What about the Canon 18-200? Sub-par quality, noisy, overpriced.

    Back to the D3100. Auto white balance (the second most important thing after composition) works great, even indoor (no cloudy setting necessary), the only changes are extreme situations (outdoor shade, or indoor fluorescent or tungsten lights at night, but that is true with every camera. Why that is is beyond me; can’t they make smarter cameras that account for…

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