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Sony DSCRX1R/B 24MP Compact System Cyber-Shot Digital Still Camera with 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black)


Sony DSCRX1R/B 24MP Compact System Cyber-Shot Digital Still Camera with 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black)


Discover astonishing picture clarity and fine-tuned performance without the optical low-pass filter (OLPF). In a land where detail is king, we’ve completely maxed out image sharpness by removing the OLPF. What’s left is a full-frame, 24.3-megapixel marvel that captures amazing detail resolution-and fits right in your pocket.

  • Full Frame 24 MP resolution with 14-bit RAW output
  • Ultimate resolution in 35mm full frame format
  • F2.0 Carl Zeiss Sonnar T lens with macro capability

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What customers say about Sony DSCRX1R/B 24MP Compact System Cyber-Shot Digital Still Camera with 3-Inch LCD Screen (Black)?

  1. 613 of 670 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Too limited for $2800, but for some it will be camera perfection, December 4, 2012
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    I purchased and received this camera from Amazon.

    I also own a Canon 5D Mark II, Olympus OM-D E-M5, and Sony RX100

    I must say I had really high hopes for this camera. I hoped for a low-light monster that would provide the critical image quality that I turn to my 5D Mark II for, just in a more portable package. For reference I also own the Canon 35mm L f/1.4. For better or for worse, this review will be based on my experience with the RX1 compared to the 5D, OM-D and RX100.

    First the good…

    1.) The image quality is really that good. If you read Steve Huff and look at his samples, they are representative. I must admit the lens/camera combo *is capable* of producing images better than my 5D Mark II (see negatives). the lens is sharper at wide apertures than the Canon. The high ISO performance is really amazing. Probably one of the best Full Frame cameras of any form factor with respect to ISO performance.

    2.) It’s well built, if not perfect (more on this in the negatives). It feels much more solid than the RX100, but not at the level of the 5D or the OM-D.

    3.) The ergonomics and controls are pretty good for the small form factor. I like the manual aperture ring and exp. comp. dial, but really I still prefer the ergonomics on both the 5D and OM-D

    4.) Good Auto features for deep pocketed amateurs. In truth I did not test these features extensively

    Now the Negatives…

    1.) The camera struggles to focus in anything but good and great light. In low and moderately low light (read normally lit interior of a home) the camera misses focus on anything that is not static or has high contrast. Taking pictures of people / faces in these conditions, the camera focuses on the background (which is static and higher contrast) in 30-70% of my shots. This is very similar to my experience with the NEX 7, another camera I have owned and shot with. It is truly maddening to have a camera with so much potential that will not nail focus with any consistency. I warn any OM-D E-M5 owners, you will not be satisfied with the focusing performance on this camera unless you only shoot outdoors in good light or shoot still life. If you like to shoot pictures of kids or any non static people in less than ideal lighting, the camera does not cut it.

    2.) The ergonomics should be better. I get the cool look of the camera, but given how far the lens sticks out from the body, Sony could easily have added more grip and better ergonomics without adding to the form factor negatively. The OM-D paired with the very sharp Panasonic 20mm 1.7 or Leica 25mm 1.4 has a similar form factor but better ergonomics

    3.) if Olympus can weather seal the $999 OM-D, why can’t Sony weather proof the RX1 which has a fixed lens and cost $2,800.00.

    4.) The lack of image stabilization nullifies some of the ISO performance vs. the OM-D

    5.) I love the idea of a fast 35mm prime, but for some, $2,800 might be to much to commit into a fixed lens camera.

    6.) When you spend this much on an item, do companies like Sony really have to price-gouge you on the accessories, like viewfinders and thumb rests!??!?! I digress….

    7.) the lens does not perform as well at smaller apertures and when focused closer to infinity, so it’s not quite as good for landscape shooters

    As I mentioned at the beginning, this review has been based on my experience and comparison of the RX1 and my other camera systems. This camera’s sensor and lens are capable of real magic. In the right conditions it is really a dream. But for me, the RX1 did not fit the bill, literally at $2,799, and figuratively in terms of performance in lower light, which to me is where I would be using it often.

    Hope this helps someone in deciding.

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  2. 107 of 113 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    An absolutely unique photographic tool that has no peer in the marketplace, February 6, 2013
    By 
    D. F. Watt “dfwatt” (Natick, MA USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    If you managed to get this far through the enormous number of reviews of the camera, you’re either a glutton for punishment, are you really are a researcher and aficionado of high-end digital photography. Let’s assume it’s the latter and get to the really interesting stuff.

    This camera is in a class of one. There’s really nothing like it anywhere in the marketplace. It’s absurdly expensive for a point-and-shoot, and yet it takes pictures that rival in overall image quality – and in many cases equal or even exceed – what the very best full frame professional cameras are capable of generating . . . . . while fitting fairly comfortably in your jacket pocket. It looks like your neighbor’s point-and-shoot $350 Canon, but costs more than your last vacation. It doesn’t even have a viewfinder, either optical or electronic – although you can get a great electronic one, if you don’t mind being soaked for another $450 on top of what you’ve already shelled out for this expensive but marvelous piece of technology. Or you can get really hosed by Zeiss, and get an optical viewfinder for another $650 – easily the most overpriced accessory in digital photography. It isn’t the fastest focusing, and it requires you to move closer or farther to get the shot that you want instead of zooming in or out given the fixed focal length lens. It can be both maddening to struggle with under the wrong circumstances . . . and at the same time a breeze to use like any other point-and-shoot. It seems wildly overpriced in some sense (compared to any other compact?), but is a genuine bargain in terms of what you are getting (best current 35mm 2.0 lens, best 24MP FF sensor in tiny package with highly customizable operating system).

    It’s like nothing else really. Its high ISO performance is equal to anything and I do mean anything out there. It’s capable of taking low noise images at ISO 6400, and with a little bit of cleanup and working in RAW, you can easily salvage fairly high quality pictures at ISO 12,800 with lots of detail and little loss of information due to noise. This competes with some of the most expensive FF models in terms of low light ability (the Canon 1Dx, 6D, 5DIII, Nikon D4 and D600 – at worst, it is very close to those benchmark systems in terms of low light ability – at best it is equal to any of them).

    Overall, the camera is something of a walking contradiction in terms in many ways (a full frame compact), and at the same time, it’s a camera that’s capable of inspiring enormous loyalty and will likely generate a truly cult-like following, while many other people may simply shake their heads at what they see as Sony’s foolishness. People will complain about the cost, but it’s really a good value and you get what you pay for.

    Pros:

    1) Remarkable compactness and portability for such enormous low light capabilities w/full frame sensor – an engineering tour de force in terms of cramming full frame capabilities into a point-and-shoot size and form factor (achievable only with a fixed lens).
    2) Capable of remarkable detail due to its 24 megapixel full frame sensor with excellent color and dynamic range. DxO sensor score of 93 (4th highest of any tested camera including some medium format sensors).
    3) Superb Carl Zeiss 35mm F 2.0 fixed lens that is sharp edge-to-edge (which for FF camera might cost $1200 or so by itself). (F4-f8 offers sharpest pictures edge to edge but f2 is still impressive). Highest rated 35mm lens available by DxO testing.
    4) As good high ISO as virtually any full frame camera.
    5) Intuitive but deep operating system and menu structures, immediately familiar to those coming from Sony Alpha background. Easy to run as full manual camera (excellent manual control dials for exposure, lens aperture, etc) . . . or put on full AUTO, and all shades in between. Good aperture priority mode operation (my personal fav).
    6) Capable of shooting 1080 at 60p and taking good video in low light, and with full IS (image stabilization) but see cons.
    7) Macro functionality in CZ lens (but see cons). Macro mode works well with built-in flash (not always the case suggesting they paid attention to this issue).
    8) Customizable buttons and other nice user config operating system features.
    9) Crop/zoom functionality of x1.4 and x2.0 partially mitigates fixed lens restrictions (equivalent to 50 and 70 mm lens but with obvious loss of resolution).
    10) High build quality w/ nice magnesium chassis – has very solid feel (it ought to for this much $!).
    11) Decent flash.
    12) Nice JPEGs vs. the competition – Sony’s stay fairly sharp to 3200 at least, while Nikon and (to a much lesser extent) Canon default JPEGs are losing detail at those ISOs. Adjustable NR on high ISO images in JPEG – setting to LOW can help to preserve details.
    13) ISO scale goes all the way down to 50 and all the way up to 25,600 (ISO 50 is…

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